Home » inflation » Where Have All the (New) Dollars Gone?

Where Have All the (New) Dollars Gone?

by John Rubino on October 2, 2013 · 35 comments

A couple of comments on recent DollarCollapse posts have included a strange assertion, that the paper money in circulation in the US is all dated 2009 or before. Apparently there are no new bills:

Suzanne, September 4
I’d like to point out something:

Look at your cash… you won’t see any paper dollars of any denomination printed after 2009. The money the Fed is printing is strictly numbers in data entry.

If everyone goes to get their money out of the bank or stock market, there isn’t enough cash to go around. Get cash into your hands, use some to buy precious metal, and keep cycling that cash, and keep a chunk of it in the house for use in case of a “bank holiday”.

 

Bruce C., October 1
Rather than comment on this subject, I’d like to ask other readers for feedback about something that seems very mysterious.

About a month ago, someone called “Suzanne” wrote a comment here that read, “I’d like to point out something: Look at your cash… you won’t see any paper dollars of any denomination printed after 2009.” (http://dollarcollapse.com/the-economy/confluence/)

I thought that was very interesting and have since checked hundreds of bills of all denominations (up to $100) and haven’t found any of Series 2010, 2011, 2012, or 2013. She may be right about that, and that the Fed is “printing”/creating money in digital form only, in the account balances at the primary dealer banks (mostly as “reserves”).

It’s not clear to me yet why this might be happening, but if it’s true then the net effect is the gradual reduction of physical US currency in the world. (The “money supply” may be increasing but in digital form only, not as cash in circulation.) The reason for this is that a portion of all cash transactions eventually make their way into the banking system in which worn out bills are supposed to be replaced with new ones, presumably ones that show the year the bills were printed (e.g., Series 2012). But, evidently, that may not be what’s happening, so fewer and fewer bills remain in circulation over time. I haven’t even found a new looking Series 2009, in case all new bills printed after 2009 continue to have that mark, for whatever reason. I’ve heard that banks want to create a cashless monetary system, and this could be the way they are trying to do it. Another possibility is that a new devalued currency is being planned that will replace US dollars, rendering them obsolete. Nevertheless, it probably is a good idea to stash some real cash while it’s still readily available in case the SHTF.

Has any one out there found any bills of Series 2010 or later?

Today I checked the cash that’s lying around the house (about $300, mostly in twenties), and found nothing newer than 2009.

Thoughts?

  • Bill Hoyt

    2009 or newer. However, that doesn’t mean that new money’s not being printed, it merely means the “series” isn’t being updated. It is generally accepted that a $1 bill lasts 18 months in circulation. That’s one of the main arguments for replacing it with a coin. Had we really now more than twice that without printing new ones, we would either have none or they would all be ragged. If you have stiff, crisp ones with all their corners intact in your wallet (I do), odds are they were printed this year or last.

    • Bill Hoyt

      I should have said “2009 or older.” I found no bills dated 2010 or later. However, we know the Treasury is still printing physical bill, because they are still screwing them up: http://miami.cbslocal.com/2013/09/06/mishap-at-the-money-factory-delays-100-bill-release/

      • DWright

        Interesting discussion. The only place I consistently can get new looking
        paper currency is in a casino. Haven’t been in one for a while but will be more observant next trip.
        DWright

    • Bruce C.

      “Had we really now more than twice that without printing new ones, …”

      On what basis can you conclude that all new bills are merely not being updated? Have you found any seemingly new (i.e., “stiff, crisp”) ones?

      • Bill Hoyt

        “Have you found any seemingly new (i.e., “stiff, crisp”) ones?”

        Yes, I have three, crisp, 2009 $1 bills in my wallet right now. The corners on two of them are not even bent. There’s no way they have been in circulation for 4 years. I therefore conclude that they were printed this year with a 2009 date.

        The signatories on them are Rosa Gumataotao Rios and Tim Geitner, both appointed in 2009. Since there was no change in those names until earlier this year, they could just keep printing from the same 2009 plates until one of the signatories changed. But that’s just a guess on my part.

  • TBone

    It is to ensure total control of all individuals financial affairs. You cannot buy or sell (in private) if an electronic money system is in use. It also makes confiscation and devaluation a snap. There are more paper dollars outside the U.S. than inside. The government is getting ready to close our borders to returning dollars and then issue new 30%-60% devalued dollars to suppliment an electronic dollar taxing/devaluing/monitoring system. The only way out from under this corrupted and controling system is to purchase Silver. I applaude Suzanne for noticeing what is in plain sight. Please, Please, Please trade in all your electronic digits NOW ! You must not wait. Buy food, water storage/filter, Silver, propane, and yes; guns and ammo. I have had strong beliefs for the coming destructionof the U.S. since 2004,This month seems very troubling. I pray for all of the world.

  • Sven

    I just checked my wallet. Nothing newer than 2009.

    • No_Favs

      I just checked your wallet too: NOTHING

  • http://www.free-bullion-investment-guide.com/ Steven Warrenfeltz

    There will be new $100 dollar bills distributed soon – October 8th.. See this article from USA Today http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/business/2013/09/22/new-100-dollar-bills/2849643/

  • PaperIsPoverty

    There’s a thread on the Ron Paul forums about this issue: http://bit.ly/1fJMjj6 . It also suggests that they’re printing bills which are new, but stamped 2009.

    This got me wondering how we measure the total amount of physical cash inside the United States. Apparently M0 includes some non-cash assets, so that’s not a good measure. I’d like to know whether printing of new bills is equal to the shredding of old, tattered bills, or if the quantity of bills is steadily declining (which I suspect is the case). Even if we knew, a lot of American cash is outside the country, maybe as much of a third of it due to the drug trade, arms trade, etc.

    Some survivalists think that the value of physical cash will totally disconnect from that of virtual cash once the financial system starts breaking down. So (to pick an extreme example to illustrate) you could buy your gas with your Visa for $15/gallon, or with hard cash at $2/gallon. The shortage of physical cash would create deflation in cash, while the opposite (high inflation) would be happening in virtual dollars. I’m not arguing for or against this idea but consider it interesting.

  • Bill Hoyt

    This might be the answer: “It is important to note that there is not a series for every calendar
    year. A new series will result from a change in the Secretary of the
    Treasury, the Treasurer of the United States, and/or a change to the
    note’s appearance such as a new currency design.” http://www.onedollarbill.org/decoding.html

    Since the same Treasury Sec and Treasurer served from 2009 until this year, all money printed until 2013 will be from “Series 2009.”

    • Bruce C.

      I feel really sheepish about not knowing that. I’ve since learned a lot more about the meanings of the markings of US currency, and it’s more complicated than I realized, and ever-changing as well.

      No excuses, but considering the inventory that I took I had a plausible doubt.

      Out of a random sample of 40 100-dollar bills I found 5 from 1996, 2 from 1999, 12 from 2003, and 21 from 2006, and 11 from 2009.

      Out of a random sample of 74 50-dollar bills I found 14 from 1996, 1 from 2001, 9 from 2004, 21 from 2006, and 29 from 2009.

      There were more Series 2009s in twenties than anything else, but there were still a lot that were over 5 years old.

      The fact that so many old bills (older than 18 months or so) are in still in circulation led me to believe that they weren’t being replaced with 2009 bills, at least after 2009.

      Nevertheless, I think the mystery is solved. Thanks for responding.

      • Heli_Ebook

        Mail ‘em over here so I can check: Po box 243, Hutto Tx, 78634

  • Dang

    There hardly any new dollars let out into the economy. other wise you be looking at lots of inflation> Here is the real story. The government bailed out the banks on wall street. with 1 trillion dollars by putting spreading it into the huge banks. Thus through fractional reserve banking law they can lend 10 times that amount out they now have $10,000,000,000,000. frog skins to loan out. But here is the secret. they didn’t lend this out the people it went to the gov to buy treasury bills at 2 an 3 percent interest. An the American people got the shaft. An even worse the people put there money in the bank at 2% interest an the get to facture it times 10 an lend it at 8 to 10%.

  • DavidN

    Wikipedia says the only bill with a newer series than 2009 is the 2013 $5 and the soon to be released $100. You might want to devnull this thread rather than admit that almost no one here knows how to look up something simple like that. Bill Hoyt quotes a different source but the answer is the same.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_dollar

    • Bruce C.

      Boy do I feel stupid! I thought the “series” year was the year the bill was printed, similar to coins. It never occurred to me to look that up, which surprises me. (In the construction business incorrect assumptions can be very embarrassing and costly in both time and money.)

      Thanks for the lesson.

  • Yuringa

    checked with all local banks in Australia requesting USD$ with release date/series greater than 2009 … response was negative NOT available also none available to German tourists so what are we to conclude …?

  • Kent

    Someone must be hording the notes because according to the
    FED the volume in circulation continues to increase annually. See:
    http://www.federalreserve.gov/paymentsystems/coin_data.htm

  • Suzanne

    Hi Bruce!
    Glad you picked up on my comment. I’ve been trying to call attention to this one finding.
    You think that the lack of printing of new paper money has to do with the cabal’s plan to introduce a plastic (card) cashless currency after they’ve finally collapsed the system? After all, all the “money printing” the Fed is doing is digital transfers. Various government agencies and companies get their money wired to banks. Most people get their paychecks as data transfers to their banks.
    Cash is for the little guys with math skills… everyone else walks around with debit cards.
    … Which leaves me with something Catherine Austin Fitts spoke of in one of her interviews… she said the reason why the cabal is trying to take away our guns, specifically semi-autos, is because that is what the average baby-boomer finds easiest to use. She stated that the average home invasion robbery is conducted by three or more thugs, and that semi-autos give us a fighting chance.
    She also mentioned that the reason why the cabal is trying to disarm us is that they are eyeing-up the $12 trillion or so in Americans’ savings and retirement accounts. When things start to collapse, the cabal always siphons all the money and assets on the way down, including bail-ins, IRAs, CDs, pensions and 401(k)s. They can’t do it if we are armed.

    • Bruce C.

      Hi Suzanne, and your welcome. It was fun checking out so many bills and speculating about what it could mean. “Unfortunately” It may not be so mysterious after all. Evidently, the Series year doesn’t mean the print year so 2009 bills have been printed for the last four years or so, not just in 2009. There probably is more to this than that but it seems impossible to conclude much just from the evidence (there are still a surprising number of old bills in circulation, many of which aren’t recognized by ATMs and the like, and 4 years is an unusually long time for the same currency design to last.) One of these days some crazy, surreptitious stuff is bound to occur but I guess just not yet, although the book keeping tricks at the Treasury to get around the debt ceiling is close.

      • Suzanne

        All the cash I’ve seen outside of 1s looks really crisp. I figured it was because most people are running around with debit cards.
        Given that the FDIC only has about $25 billion to insure… what… $12 trillion in Americans’ savings… I don’t believe that we should wait until a “crisis” happens to plan ahead. I tell everyone to keep enough cash to cover at least two months’ bills, and as little as actually required in the bank to cover monthly bill-paying… everything else in “preps” and bullion.
        A friend of mine had recently awakened. She was down at the local coin/bullion store having a meltdown earlier this week… I had to coach her over the phone. Golly.
        We’re seeing what looks like a combination of Weimar and Nazi Germany all at once.

  • frank

    Series 2009 A is still printing.

  • AZVeteran

    Out of a couple of Thousand in bills, none are marked newer than 2009. Cant believe that is a coincidence. I have long believed that a good way to control the masses is to control utilities, water, food and, yes, money. If all money becomes electronic the with a push of the computer key you may or may not exist as a citizen in a cashless society. Without money they have total control of you and your family. A Poli Sci prof I had back in the day once told me that govt, by nature, was like a Boa Constrictor. The Boa squeezed and the citizen squirmed and complained. the Boa relaxed and then later it squeezed again. This process would continue until the citizen was totally compliant, (Or Was Dead). He further said Govt was not necessarily evil, but the results of it pursuing its very Nature, resulted in Mass Horrors……………….Something to think about.

  • sculptor

    jees you are right! I have around $67,000 under my matrass and I just tooked through it all I looked and looked and couldn’t find anything older than a 2005….then I remembered that I started using all my cash to buy gold and silver starting in 2005…whew! But seriously folks…HAVE A STASH OF CASH.(not under the bed but somewhere house fire proof) the silver gold trade thing might work, or might not, or probably might take awhile to come up to speed in a financial turmoil banks-closed panic situation. people will cling to what they know, and they know paper, and if paper’s getting scarce and hoarded and the digital money stuff has disappeared in a magic pooof!, well then wouldn’t it be ironic if you had to part with silver dollars for $3 a piece to buy bread cause you didn’t have some worthless paper dollars which grocery stores still accepted.

    It going to be an interesting decade folks, stock up on chef boyardee, pasta, beans and bullets…..and…..$5′s, $10′s and $20′s

    • Nucking Futs

      …and condoms to use with your ex wife!

  • Anthony Sanders

    Even worse, government WILL raise taxes to close to 100% and begin wealth confiscation to pay for their insane spending and debt. http://confoundedinterest.wordpress.com/2013/10/05/shutdown-big-bird-child-cancer-and-unsustainable-national-debt-and-entitlements-cancer/

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  • dj2

    Interesting but as many have pointed out, this is basically a nonstory. 2009 refers to the series of bills, not the actual year the bills were printed. New bills are printed all the time. And in fact there is a 2013 series but not much is in circulation yet.

    This makes sense as cash just isn’t used as much anymore.

    Still, it’s useful to learn new things. Keeping some cash is a good idea, it hedges against bank holidays and breakdowns in the grid based electrodollar system. In the end it’s all still just fiat currency, whose value is completely at the whim of the central planners.

  • Anthony Sanders

    As the US transitions to a “swipe” economy with little cash and all plastic, paper dollars will go the way of the dodo. That is why gold and silver will gain strength … again.

    • Get Stuft

      Thanks, Col. Sanders!

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  • John

    The way I understand the “money creation” of quantitative easing one, two and three, goes like this. You’re right they didn’t actually print the money, so old fashioned. And all that paper and messy ink. The U.S. Treasury calls it ex nahito sp.? Latin for ” From Nothing” They just add zeros to accounts at Federal Reserve Banks and poof,. trillions of dollars. Then it gets even better as the new zeros are distributed to commercial banks who are allowed to leverage them 10 x more in the form of loans to consumers and businesses. That’s some crazy math if you ask me. The money from a bank for a mortgage was created from nothing and then x 10. And it’s legal. The scary part is all this money is backed by nothing more than a “Promise”. By this government? Are you kidding? Look I’m High School educated but even I can see this one coming. This a Nuclear Financial bomb on a timer.

  • m96

    QE is bank reserves. They are not lent out. Credit is lent out. Credit can be created if reserves are enough.

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  • USE_WIKIPEDIA!

    google “US DOLLAR wiki” and find out how STUPID these fear-mongerers are!


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